It has been a busy and exciting time for Remake with our site launch and an invitation to speak at the NY Times Magazine’s first live event coinciding with the magazine’s Design and Technology issue. Set in the visually stunning Jewish contemporary museum, a mix of reporters, designers and entrepreneurs, attended a conversation on technology disruptions that are shaping our future.

Interestingly, not a single panelist was American. An indication that tech disruptions will increasingly come from around the world.

Wences Casares, C.E.O. of Xapo discussed how Bitcoin would someday replace banks and allow us to exchange value around the world in a way that is as frictionless, free and fast as exchanging information. Next Mike Krieger, co-founder of Instagram discussed how photos are a universal way to connect as humans and deepen global connections.

These conversations nicely segued to announce the launch of Remake as the world’s first platform that builds human connections between all of us as people who shop, back to the makers who meet our insatiable demand for the things we wear and touch everyday.

NYT Mag Live - REMAKE founder Ayesha Barenblat
Photo: Kimberly White/Getty

Here are the 3 ways Remake is harnessing technology that is already available to build human connections between shoppers and makers:

Appealing to hearts not just minds

The power of video and storytelling is crucial to inspire shoppers to care and advocate for the wellbeing of makers. I am betting that if you can see her, meet her, get to know her, then you will be moved to want a better life for her, the maker of your stuff.

The power of dialogue

Twitter allows an exchange of ideas and dialogue between brands, shoppers and workers in a way that’s never been possible before. At Remake we want shoppers to start conversations on Twitter and Facebook with their favorite brands, asking “Who made this? What are their lives like?”

Betting on millennials values

There are eighty million millennials in America alone with $200 billion in annual spending power.  75% say they prefer brands that give back to society while making a profit. Remake is targeting this generation before their shopping and business habits are set. We want them to see that the makers around the world are the same age as them, and their hopes and dream are no different.

Invariably since I happened to be on the only female panel on a day that discussed technology and Silicon Valley, the question of diversity and race came up.

I told Jenna Wortham, “Perhaps if you had more women and people of color in the mix in the tech sector, we would have more diversity of thinking and products. And maybe, like Remake, we would have more of a focus to apply technology for good, to tackle the world’s toughest problems.”

We ended on a light note with my asking Jenna, whose NY Times columns focus on how tech is changing our culture, if she would be open to starting a Twitter conversation with her favorite celebrities the Kardashians, on what the working conditions are like for their Sears Kardashian Kollection?

And with Beyonce’s recent announcement to partner with Topshop on a new Activewear line, perhaps she could ask Bey about the lives of the makers behind her new label?

At the cocktail reception after, I was heartened and humbled by how many entrepreneurs, designers and reporters came up to note that they were moved by Remake’s mission and compelled to think about their shopping habits.

Overnight we were excited to see our Remake community grow by over five hundred people. I personally had people write to say that they went home that night to look at all the labels in their closet. A few further challenged me to make it simple and tell them which brands they should shop with.

In Remake’s July issue we will plan to do just that, putting a spotlight on brands that are increasing their focus and attention on maker well-being.

Related Stories

Join the Conversation

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Join The Movement

Get emails about ethical fashion and the stories behind the people making your clothes.

Welcome Remaker! You’re now part of the movement.